xAPI and LMS – Allies or Enemies?

Session Overview

Fifteen years after it started, LMS market is still growing. Bersin estimated that the LMS market was well over $2.5 billion and grew by over 21% in 2014. This market is driven by replacement cycles and growing adoption by small and mid-size organisations.

But this happy picture masks the discontent that many learning professionals are feeling with LMS. While ideal for page turning compliance courses, the current crop of LMS struggle to accommodate the flexible learning approaches needed by a changing workforce including 70:20:10, informal, unstructured learning and performance support.

Change is in the air. TinCan/xAPI is the latest generation of SCORM standards, which lay the foundation for employees to access learning anywhere (think articles, Facebook groups, YouTube video etc.). However mainstream adoption of TinCan/xAPI by vendors and organisations is still a couple of years away.

In the meantime, we are caught in this no man’s land where implementing innovative, blended and informal learning designs in an integrated manner will remain a challenge. Some organisations have started to use other platforms and learning delivery channels (e.g. using intranet, social collaboration platforms etc.) but this presents a fragmented experience for the learner and creates inefficiency of learning design. We discuss the current state of LMS usage in organisations and if there are any options to deliver new approaches to Learning to overcome current limitations.

Facilitator’s Point of View

 

LearningCafe Point of View

LearningCafe has observed with unease the growing gap between what L&D and Business require and what LMS currently provides. LMS has become a fine tuned platform for delivering compliance and “101” learning but struggles with delivering learning for performance support and higher level capabilities (i.e. behaviour change) where the real value add is. LearningCafe believes that TinCan/xAPI is an important development to reduce the gap but may take some time for mainstream adoption.

In the meantime, L&D should not wait but look for solutions and platforms to supplement the LMS for flexibility and increasing design options. However, this approach will be “messy” and care should be taken to provide a consistent learner experience.

LearningCafe has started an Ideas@work project to accelerate the adoption of TinCan/xAPI in Australia (www.ideasatwork.com.au)

Big Questions

  • Have LMS kept pace with business requirements? Is your current LMS supporting flexible learning design?
  • There is a large ecosystem built around the LMS i.e. teams, skills and vendors. Will this slow down the adoption of xAPI/TinCan?
  • TinCan/xAPI is a technological and conceptual leap for L&D. Is L&D ready for it? What are your predictions for TinCan/xAPI?

Disruptive Thoughts

  • Don’t regard LMS as the centre of organisational learning. If you do, it may limit your design options. Not all learning needs to be tracked and these can reside outside the LMS.

Resources

  • Sharing our TinCan/xAPI@Work Journey – Step 1 – Validating the L&D Potential – LearningCafe webinar recording https://vimeo.com/129063274
  • xAPI/TinCan@work – A collaborative exploration by Asia Pac organisations facilitated by Learning Café Webinar (www.ideasatwork.com.au)
     

Facilitator

Arun Pradhan – Senior Learning & Performance Consultant at Deakin Prime

 

Pokémon Go – Hype and Reality for Employee Learning

Session Overview

Pokémon GO is a mobile is a free-to-play location-based, augmented reality (AR) gameplayers use a mobile device’s GPS capability to locate, capture, battle, and train virtual creatures, called Pokémon, who appear on the screen as if they were in the same real-world location as the player.

The Pokémon Go craze has spread quickly around the world since its July 6 debut, breaking records along the way. It’s dominated top iOS and Android app charts, and Apple said last week that it had the most first-week downloads of any iOS app ever. People are spending more time using the app (an average of 33 minutes a day) than popular go-tos like Facebook and Snapchat.

There is discussion about using the Pokémon Go approach for employee Learning. Use case include onboarding and safety.

Facilitator’s Point of View

Pokémon Go has brought Augmented Reality as a concept and technology to the masses.

Augmented Reality is already used for training purposes in the army, top-sports and early adopting companies. Augmented Reality offers 4 opportunities:

  1. context specific data
  2. visualized in 3D
  3. interactive
  4. overlaid on the real world using a mobile or wearable device

When combined it can be a powerful mix and deliver a more intuitive, engaging and relevant manner of learning. Deploying Augmented Reality will become as simple as using Powerpoint.

LearningCafePoint of View

L&D needs to assess the adoption of Next Gen Tech such as AR and whether they should incorporate them as vehicles to deliver learning. Next Gen Tech require a higher cognitive and new design skills sets and L&D should work out how they intend to acquire these skills i.e. hire or outsource.L&D should get know Next Gen Tech better and get some hands on experience.

Big Questions

  • What lessons from the success of Pokémon GO can we apply to employee Learning?
  • Where can AR be applied for employee Learning?
  • Assuming that L&D wants to play in Next Gen Tech, how should the required skills be acquired? Will we need to include programming and game design professionals in the L&D team or simply outsource them?

Disruptive Thoughts

  • Could AR be used in classroom training specially for complex learning such as sales simulation?
  • Do we need programmers as part of the L&D team?

Next Steps

  • Read about use of Virtual Reality
  • Register for a Learning Cafe Immersion workshop on VR Design for Learning (http://bit.ly/uceoi)
  • Coursera MOOC – Emerging Trends & Technologies in the Virtual K-12 Classroom

Resources

Facilitator

Erik van Vulpen, Marketing & Strategy at Plattar

Gamification – Are we there yet?

Session Overview

Gamification is the application of game design/mechanisms (such as Challenge, Progress, Status, Reward, Social/Expression) to non-gaming scenarios. It is a very broad discipline that has been performed for many years in both business and non-business situations to engage, drive and motivate people.

Unfortunately, the term “gamification” has been used to describe the discipline and leads to many misunderstandings/misconceptions (as people focus on the “game” nuances and not the “-ification” impacts).

Facilitator’s Point of View

Unlike other divisions of HR, L&D has been applying gamification to many methods of learning delivery (for example, keeping a scoreboard of learning teams progress and awarding “team/participant” of a classroom based course”). However, digital tools and mobile/social trends now allow us to take this practice to the next level and integrate L&D with other aspects of HR such as Performance Management and Project Management. The trend is becoming more common and accepted across businesses once understood (and we are seeing strong elements in major ERP systems such as SAP/Success Factors, Oracle (Taleo and Fusion) and Workday (e.g. Rypple). The mechanisms if applied correctly should address all generations, genders and ethnic origins (but are certainly shaking up organisational in terms of structure, work practices and culture). L&D has an amazing opportunity here to lead the organisation through this journey.

LearningCafe Point of View

 

Big Questions

  • Is Gamification, peripheral or joining mainstream learning at the workplace? Can it be incorporated into classroom and vocational training?
  • Will the business warm to it? Or will our learners demand it?
  • How does gamification impact our current design processes, budget and team capability?

Disruptive Thoughts

 

Next Steps

 

Resources

Facilitator

 Theresa Lim, CEO at Play2Lead